News

moodlite - Coming soon


Soldering Light Strips

MrSpeedy · 331

MrSpeedy

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 8
    • Likes: +0/-0
    • View Profile
on: February 11, 2019, 11:15:33 AM
Hey guys so I have about 6 panels printed i just got my servo wires delivered from china but Im having such a hard time soldering the wires to the LED strips im new to soldering and I cant seem to find a tutorial that helps me or anything. What seems to be happening is that the solder wont stick to the strips and its so fragile that the strips starts to melt. whenever I manage to stick the wire onto the strip it just pops off and doesnt stay. Any help would be appreciated.



MaxiZ

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 5
    • Likes: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #1 on: February 11, 2019, 12:20:08 PM
I had problems myself in the beginning since I'm also more or less a beginner. First check if your solder is for electronics. Second I found it easier to apply the solder at first to the wire then press the wire with the solder on it on the LED strip with the soldering tool. Hope that helps a little.



ARN

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 12
    • Likes: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #2 on: February 11, 2019, 01:34:35 PM
I was similar at the beginning.
Tip 1: ask on the electronics shop for a quality soldering iron. Will last longer and give you more consistent r suits.
Tip 2: Look on YouTube for "cable tinning" you will find good tips to get started.
Tip 3: if you are serious about doing a lot from here on, get some helping hands, they make your life easier.
I decided to tin both all cables then all leds and  then just put them close and the iron, it's very easy that way.



MrSpeedy

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 8
    • Likes: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #3 on: February 11, 2019, 07:27:20 PM
Yea I tried tinning the LEDs and the Wire but the solder doesnt seem to want to stick to the actual coppery part of the LED guessing its bad solder?



ARN

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 12
    • Likes: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #4 on: February 11, 2019, 07:52:17 PM
For easier tinning people use Flux
I bought one that the seller said it is "pre fluxed". I can't tell if it is true, but it really sticks very easy to the surfaces.



BanhammersWrath

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 5
    • Likes: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #5 on: February 11, 2019, 09:51:03 PM
Yea using your own flux is definitely a huge help.  Even if the solder has flux built into it if you're tinning the wire and applying the solder to the strip first it's most likely already been burnt off by the heat.  Adding your own layer to the solder points will help the wire bind to the solder you put on the strip in advance.  Another major help is having a rig with some flexible arms to hold the strips steady while you work with the wire and iron.



williampatton

  • Newbie
  • *
    • Posts: 1
    • Likes: +2/-0
    • View Profile
Reply #6 on: February 11, 2019, 10:36:48 PM
Solder will normally stick to copper pads with ease. The reason that your solder doesn't want to stick is probably because of oxidization. Copper pads, solder and even your soldering iron will oxidize over time - quicker when it's hot. Flux helps with this for 2 reasons of note:

1) meeting point in the low 100s means there is fluid present that helps speed up the transfer of heat from the iron to the pad/wire/solder.

2) because it is slightly acidic it removes the oxidization from the pads.

For easiest attaching I suggest you tin both the wire and the pad. Use flux on the pad if you have any before tinning and then more flux when joining the wires to it. The flux really does help.

Edit: also worth pointing out that flux burns away quickly so if you keep the solder liquid too long or melt it many times the flux will be gone and the metal will get harder to work with. If your solder is not shiny or it goes dull when cooled is likely got no flux left. You can fix it by just covering in flux and flowing it again :)

If you don't have any flux available then you could try a technique I've used to tin pads in problematic locations. I've been told it is similar to something called `tig welding` but I don't know what that is. Basically you hold the unmelted solder on the pad and bring the iron down onto it and then off again quickly. Almost as though you're smashing the solder into the pad. I you have a cone tip in the iron use the side of it so theres larger surface area. Repeat untill your got a little blob of solder on there then join the wire.

Hopefully this helps you out :)
« Last Edit: February 11, 2019, 10:44:11 PM by williampatton »



 


SMF spam blocked by CleanTalk